Categories
Digital Flyers

Sick pay for self-isolation during coronavirus

Look at the criteria for receive any Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) when self-isolating

As of 13 March 2020, employees and workers who self-isolate must receive any Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) due to them from the first day they’re absent from work if it’s because:

  • they have coronavirus (COVID-19)
  • they have coronavirus symptoms, for example a high temperature, a new continuous cough or a loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste
  • someone in their household has coronavirus symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus
  • they’ve been advised to stay at home by their doctor because of an underlying health condition
  • they’ve been told to self-isolate by a doctor or NHS 111
  • they’ve been told to self-isolate by a government ‘test and trace’ service, because they’ve been in close contact with someone who tested positive (‘NHS Test and Trace’ in England, ‘Test and Protect’ in Scotland or ‘Test, trace, protect’ in Wales)

To be eligible for SSP, employees and workers must be off work for at least 4 days in a row. This includes non-working days.

Some employers can claim back up to 2 weeks’ SSP they’ve paid to anyone because of coronavirus. Find out more about claiming back SSP due to coronavirus on GOV.UK.

Employers might offer more than SSP – ‘contractual’ sick pay. Find out more about sick pay.

If an employee or worker cannot work, they should tell their employer:

  • as soon as possible
  • the reason
  • how long they’re likely to be off for

If someone has symptoms or has tested positive

If someone has symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus, they must stay at home (self-isolate) for at least 10 days.

View more

If someone is told to self-isolate by a test and trace service

If a government 'test and trace' service tells someone they've recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, they must self-isolate for 10 days.

View more

Self-isolating after returning to the UK

Some people returning to the UK must self-isolate (or 'quarantine') for 10 days, depending on the country they've travelled from.

View more

If the employer needs proof

Employees in self-isolation need to follow their workplace's usual sickness reporting process.

View more

If someone has symptoms or has tested positive

If someone has symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus, they must stay at home (self-isolate) for at least 10 days.

If someone has symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus, they must stay at home (self-isolate) for at least 10 days.

Anyone else in their household must also self-isolate for 10 days.

If anyone else in the household starts displaying symptoms or tests positive for coronavirus, they must self-isolate for at least 10 days from the day they first have symptoms or test positive. This is regardless of where they are in the initial 10-day isolation period.

For more about households with coronavirus symptoms:

Content provided by Acas

Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:01:08 GMT
Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:29:24 GMT

If someone is told to self-isolate by a test and trace service

If a government 'test and trace' service tells someone they've recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, they must self-isolate for 10 days.

If a government ‘test and trace’ service tells someone they’ve recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, they must self-isolate for 10 days. If they develop symptoms, everyone else in their household must self-isolate for 10 days.

If someone is told to self-isolate by a test and trace service, they could be entitled to a £500 support payment from their local authority.

To be eligible, the person must be:

  • employed or self-employed
  • on a low income
  • unable to work from home and will lose income as a result of self-isolating

For more information about test and trace and support payments:

  • in England, see NHS Test and Trace on GOV.UK
  • in Scotland, see Test and Protect on gov.scot
  • in Wales, see Test, trace, protect on gov.wales
  • Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:04:15 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:29:40 GMT

    Self-isolating after returning to the UK

    Some people returning to the UK must self-isolate (or 'quarantine') for 10 days, depending on the country they've travelled from.

    Some people returning to the UK must self-isolate (or ‘quarantine’) for 10 days, depending on the country they’ve travelled from.

    Employees or workers are not entitled to SSP if they’re self-isolating after returning from holiday or business travel and they cannot work from home.

    They may be entitled to SSP for another reason, for example if they have coronavirus symptoms.

    An employer can choose to pay the employee an amount equivalent to SSP, or a higher amount of pay, if they want to.

    It’s a good idea to check your workplace’s policy to see if your workplace pays SSP or a higher rate of sick pay if anyone needs to self-isolate after returning to the UK.

    Find out more about holiday and leave during coronavirus.

    For more about self-isolation rules when returning to the UK in:

    Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:10:05 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:30:28 GMT

    If the employer needs proof

    Employees in self-isolation need to follow their workplace's usual sickness reporting process.

    Employees in self-isolation need to follow their workplace’s usual sickness reporting process.

    Employees can ‘self-certify’ for the first 7 days off work. This means following their workplace process but not having to get a note from a doctor or NHS 111.

    Those self-isolating due to coronavirus for more than 7 days can get an online self-isolation note from the:

    It’s a good idea to check your workplace’s policy on absence from work. Employers might need to be flexible if asking for self-isolation notes. For example, an employee with severe symptoms might not be able to get a note straight away.

    Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:07:50 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:30:06 GMT

    Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:57:06 GMT
    Modified on Fri, 19 Mar 2021 14:34:02 GMT

    Categories
    Feed Test

    Sick pay for self-isolation during coronavirus

    Look at the criteria for receive any Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) when self-isolating

    As of 13 March 2020, employees and workers who self-isolate must receive any Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) due to them from the first day they’re absent from work if it’s because:

    • they have coronavirus (COVID-19)
    • they have coronavirus symptoms, for example a high temperature, a new continuous cough or a loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste
    • someone in their household has coronavirus symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus
    • they’ve been advised to stay at home by their doctor because of an underlying health condition
    • they’ve been told to self-isolate by a doctor or NHS 111
    • they’ve been told to self-isolate by a government ‘test and trace’ service, because they’ve been in close contact with someone who tested positive (‘NHS Test and Trace’ in England, ‘Test and Protect’ in Scotland or ‘Test, trace, protect’ in Wales)

    To be eligible for SSP, employees and workers must be off work for at least 4 days in a row. This includes non-working days.

    Some employers can claim back up to 2 weeks’ SSP they’ve paid to anyone because of coronavirus. Find out more about claiming back SSP due to coronavirus on GOV.UK.

    Employers might offer more than SSP – ‘contractual’ sick pay. Find out more about sick pay.

    If an employee or worker cannot work, they should tell their employer:

    • as soon as possible
    • the reason
    • how long they’re likely to be off for

    If someone has symptoms or has tested positive

    If someone has symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus, they must stay at home (self-isolate) for at least 10 days.

    View more

    If someone is told to self-isolate by a test and trace service

    If a government 'test and trace' service tells someone they've recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, they must self-isolate for 10 days.

    View more

    Self-isolating after returning to the UK

    Some people returning to the UK must self-isolate (or 'quarantine') for 10 days, depending on the country they've travelled from.

    View more

    If the employer needs proof

    Employees in self-isolation need to follow their workplace's usual sickness reporting process.

    View more

    If someone has symptoms or has tested positive

    If someone has symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus, they must stay at home (self-isolate) for at least 10 days.

    If someone has symptoms or has tested positive for coronavirus, they must stay at home (self-isolate) for at least 10 days.

    Anyone else in their household must also self-isolate for 10 days.

    If anyone else in the household starts displaying symptoms or tests positive for coronavirus, they must self-isolate for at least 10 days from the day they first have symptoms or test positive. This is regardless of where they are in the initial 10-day isolation period.

    For more about households with coronavirus symptoms:

    Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:01:08 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:29:24 GMT

    If someone is told to self-isolate by a test and trace service

    If a government 'test and trace' service tells someone they've recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, they must self-isolate for 10 days.

    If a government ‘test and trace’ service tells someone they’ve recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, they must self-isolate for 10 days. If they develop symptoms, everyone else in their household must self-isolate for 10 days.

    If someone is told to self-isolate by a test and trace service, they could be entitled to a £500 support payment from their local authority.

    To be eligible, the person must be:

    • employed or self-employed
    • on a low income
    • unable to work from home and will lose income as a result of self-isolating

    For more information about test and trace and support payments:

  • in England, see NHS Test and Trace on GOV.UK
  • in Scotland, see Test and Protect on gov.scot
  • in Wales, see Test, trace, protect on gov.wales
  • Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:04:15 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:29:40 GMT

    Self-isolating after returning to the UK

    Some people returning to the UK must self-isolate (or 'quarantine') for 10 days, depending on the country they've travelled from.

    Some people returning to the UK must self-isolate (or ‘quarantine’) for 10 days, depending on the country they’ve travelled from.

    Employees or workers are not entitled to SSP if they’re self-isolating after returning from holiday or business travel and they cannot work from home.

    They may be entitled to SSP for another reason, for example if they have coronavirus symptoms.

    An employer can choose to pay the employee an amount equivalent to SSP, or a higher amount of pay, if they want to.

    It’s a good idea to check your workplace’s policy to see if your workplace pays SSP or a higher rate of sick pay if anyone needs to self-isolate after returning to the UK.

    Find out more about holiday and leave during coronavirus.

    For more about self-isolation rules when returning to the UK in:

    Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:10:05 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:30:28 GMT

    If the employer needs proof

    Employees in self-isolation need to follow their workplace's usual sickness reporting process.

    Employees in self-isolation need to follow their workplace’s usual sickness reporting process.

    Employees can ‘self-certify’ for the first 7 days off work. This means following their workplace process but not having to get a note from a doctor or NHS 111.

    Those self-isolating due to coronavirus for more than 7 days can get an online self-isolation note from the:

    It’s a good idea to check your workplace’s policy on absence from work. Employers might need to be flexible if asking for self-isolation notes. For example, an employee with severe symptoms might not be able to get a note straight away.

    Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:07:50 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 16:30:06 GMT

    Content provided by Acas

    Acas gives employees and employers free, impartial advice on workplace rights, rules and best practice.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:57:06 GMT
    Modified on Fri, 19 Mar 2021 14:34:02 GMT

    Categories
    Digital Flyers

    What sort of help is available?

    Your sight loss may vary from day to day, and this may affect how much help you need or want.

    How an ECLO can help you

    Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

    View more

    The emotional impact of sight loss

    It’s very common to experience a wide range of emotions when losing your sight. In this section we have put together some ideas that may help you.

    View more

    Talking to other people and finding out what’s in your local area

    It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

    View more

    Who you can talk to

    There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions.

    View more

    Getting out and about

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

    View more

    Low vision

    The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight.

    View more

    How an ECLO can help you

    Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

    Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

    This includes assistance with understanding the certification and registration process, accessing emotional support and counselling, if necessary, and providing information on sight rehabilitation and other services in the community, such as referring to your local council and voluntary organisations.

    If there are no ECLOs at your Eye Clinic, RNIB’s telephone-based Sight Loss Advisers are available on 0303 123 9999 and provide advice on anything about living with sight loss, including coping in the early stages, living independently, using technology, employment, legal rights, financial benefits and more.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:06:27 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:24 GMT

    The emotional impact of sight loss

    It’s very common to experience a wide range of emotions when losing your sight. In this section we have put together some ideas that may help you.

    It’s common for people to experience feelings of shock, denial and despair when they lose their sight, but usually these are temporary and will lessen over time. It’s natural to feel down, but if you’re struggling, we would advise you to talk to your GP or another healthcare professional and to find out what help and support they can give you.

    I lost sight in my right eye many years ago and have had over 10 operations on my left eye. I know that it’s hard at first – it was for me. There is help out there, and you’re not on your own. – Jenny

    Your sight loss may vary from day to day, and this may affect how much help you need or want.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:02:55 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 17:14:24 GMT

    Talking to other people and finding out what’s in your local area

    It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

    It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

    Your local sight loss charity can put you in touch with other people in your area, and offer support for partners, family members and friends. Visionary is the umbrella organisation for sight loss charities across the country, providing you with details of your local sight loss charity.

    Visit www.visionary.org.uk for more information. Visit the Sightline Directory for more information on your local services www.sightlinedirectory.org.uk

    You may also find it helpful to find out about the activities that are available for people with sight loss in your area. Local sight loss charities have lots of information, advice and practical solutions for people with sight loss.

    Another good place to meet other people with similar experiences is RNIB Connect. You can share your experiences, hear what others are going through, and learn and find solutions to some of the difficulties you’re facing. You can also connect with people, find out about activities and services in your local area, and join telephone groups or chat online to discuss your sight condition, and the way technology can help you to stay independent. For more information, call RNIB’s Helpline on 0303 123 9999 or visit www.rnib.org.uk/connect

    RNIB Connect Radio is made by and for people with sight loss. It broadcasts nationally with a variety of shows to suit all tastes. It has lots of information about living with sight loss. You can hear RNIB Connect Radio on Freeview Channel 730, online, or digitally via Radioplayer and Tunein apps.

    People who have served in the Armed Forces, including National Service, are eligible for specialist support from Blind Veterans UK. This includes social activities and respite breaks. They also help people to learn new skills and hobbies. For more information, call 0800 389 7979 or visit www.blindveterans.org.uk

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:14:47 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:09 GMT

    Who you can talk to

    There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions.

    There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions. For example, age-related macular degeneration is the largest cause of sight loss, and the Macular Society has a team of professional counsellors who have been trained to listen, to help people talk through their feelings, and to find ways of dealing with them. To contact the Macular Society, call 0300 3030 111 or visit www.macularsociety.org. RNIB offer several options via their Helpline on 0303 123 9999, including peer support groups, advice, practical and emotional support.

    You may find it useful to look up your condition on the internet to get the details of other organisations that are able to help you. There are a number of other things that you may find helpful, such as joining a telephone befriending service, or relaxing through yoga, meditation, mood music and audiobooks. If you want more information, contact your local sight loss charity or RNIB’s helpline on 0303 123 9999 or visit www.sightlinedirectory.org.uk. Some people have also found religion or their faith to be beneficial.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:23:24 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 14:41:52 GMT

    Getting out and about

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

    The service trains volunteers to use sighted-guiding techniques to help you to get to the places you want to go to, with confidence and on your own terms. You may want to learn or re-learn familiar routes to get to the shops, or to maintain your fitness. Training can also be provided for your friends and family to learn simple and safe guiding techniques to help you. For more information, call 0800 953 0113, email myguide@guidedogs.org.uk or visit www.guidedogs.org.uk

    The Sight Advice FAQ answers questions about living with sight loss, eye health or being newly diagnosed with a sight condition. This includes those who are supporting people through their sight loss journey, including parents, partners, carers and friends.

    This site is brought to you by many organisations working together www.sightadvicefaq.org.uk.

    Type your question into the search box or use the menu to find what you’re looking for.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:26:48 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:51 GMT

    Low vision

    The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight.

    The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight. There is equipment and there are techniques to help you to make the most of the vision that you have.

    We strongly recommend that you have a low vision assessment, as there are plenty of things that can be achieved with the right help.

    Your low vision service

    Your local low vision service can provide support and further information on sight loss. The low vision service will assess and train you to use magnifiers, lighting and low vision equipment. These are available on long term loan from councils/NHS services, including, in some areas, schemes based at local Optometrists or local sight loss charities. Low vision services across the country are delivered by different organisations. For example, they may be based in your local hospital or may be provided by a local sight loss charity. You can ask your Eye Doctor (Ophthalmologist) or the Eye Clinic Liaison Officer about your nearest low vision service.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:28:36 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:05:20 GMT

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:32:02 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:16 GMT

    Categories
    Feed Test

    What sort of help is available?

    Your sight loss may vary from day to day, and this may affect how much help you need or want.

    The emotional impact of sight loss

    It’s very common to experience a wide range of emotions when losing your sight. In this section we have put together some ideas that may help you.

    View more

    How an ECLO can help you

    Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

    View more

    Getting out and about

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

    View more

    Who you can talk to

    There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions.

    View more

    Talking to other people and finding out what’s in your local area

    It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

    View more

    Low vision

    The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight.

    View more

    The emotional impact of sight loss

    It’s very common to experience a wide range of emotions when losing your sight. In this section we have put together some ideas that may help you.

    It’s common for people to experience feelings of shock, denial and despair when they lose their sight, but usually these are temporary and will lessen over time. It’s natural to feel down, but if you’re struggling, we would advise you to talk to your GP or another healthcare professional and to find out what help and support they can give you.

    I lost sight in my right eye many years ago and have had over 10 operations on my left eye. I know that it’s hard at first – it was for me. There is help out there, and you’re not on your own. – Jenny

    Your sight loss may vary from day to day, and this may affect how much help you need or want.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:02:55 GMT
    Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 17:14:24 GMT

    How an ECLO can help you

    Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

    Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

    This includes assistance with understanding the certification and registration process, accessing emotional support and counselling, if necessary, and providing information on sight rehabilitation and other services in the community, such as referring to your local council and voluntary organisations.

    If there are no ECLOs at your Eye Clinic, RNIB’s telephone-based Sight Loss Advisers are available on 0303 123 9999 and provide advice on anything about living with sight loss, including coping in the early stages, living independently, using technology, employment, legal rights, financial benefits and more.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:06:27 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:24 GMT

    Getting out and about

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

    The service trains volunteers to use sighted-guiding techniques to help you to get to the places you want to go to, with confidence and on your own terms. You may want to learn or re-learn familiar routes to get to the shops, or to maintain your fitness. Training can also be provided for your friends and family to learn simple and safe guiding techniques to help you. For more information, call 0800 953 0113, email myguide@guidedogs.org.uk or visit www.guidedogs.org.uk

    The Sight Advice FAQ answers questions about living with sight loss, eye health or being newly diagnosed with a sight condition. This includes those who are supporting people through their sight loss journey, including parents, partners, carers and friends.

    This site is brought to you by many organisations working together www.sightadvicefaq.org.uk.

    Type your question into the search box or use the menu to find what you’re looking for.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:26:48 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:51 GMT

    Who you can talk to

    There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions.

    There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions. For example, age-related macular degeneration is the largest cause of sight loss, and the Macular Society has a team of professional counsellors who have been trained to listen, to help people talk through their feelings, and to find ways of dealing with them. To contact the Macular Society, call 0300 3030 111 or visit www.macularsociety.org. RNIB offer several options via their Helpline on 0303 123 9999, including peer support groups, advice, practical and emotional support.

    You may find it useful to look up your condition on the internet to get the details of other organisations that are able to help you. There are a number of other things that you may find helpful, such as joining a telephone befriending service, or relaxing through yoga, meditation, mood music and audiobooks. If you want more information, contact your local sight loss charity or RNIB’s helpline on 0303 123 9999 or visit www.sightlinedirectory.org.uk. Some people have also found religion or their faith to be beneficial.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:23:24 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 14:41:52 GMT

    Talking to other people and finding out what’s in your local area

    It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

    It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

    Your local sight loss charity can put you in touch with other people in your area, and offer support for partners, family members and friends. Visionary is the umbrella organisation for sight loss charities across the country, providing you with details of your local sight loss charity.

    Visit www.visionary.org.uk for more information. Visit the Sightline Directory for more information on your local services www.sightlinedirectory.org.uk

    You may also find it helpful to find out about the activities that are available for people with sight loss in your area. Local sight loss charities have lots of information, advice and practical solutions for people with sight loss.

    Another good place to meet other people with similar experiences is RNIB Connect. You can share your experiences, hear what others are going through, and learn and find solutions to some of the difficulties you’re facing. You can also connect with people, find out about activities and services in your local area, and join telephone groups or chat online to discuss your sight condition, and the way technology can help you to stay independent. For more information, call RNIB’s Helpline on 0303 123 9999 or visit www.rnib.org.uk/connect

    RNIB Connect Radio is made by and for people with sight loss. It broadcasts nationally with a variety of shows to suit all tastes. It has lots of information about living with sight loss. You can hear RNIB Connect Radio on Freeview Channel 730, online, or digitally via Radioplayer and Tunein apps.

    People who have served in the Armed Forces, including National Service, are eligible for specialist support from Blind Veterans UK. This includes social activities and respite breaks. They also help people to learn new skills and hobbies. For more information, call 0800 389 7979 or visit www.blindveterans.org.uk

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:14:47 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:09 GMT

    Low vision

    The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight.

    The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight. There is equipment and there are techniques to help you to make the most of the vision that you have.

    We strongly recommend that you have a low vision assessment, as there are plenty of things that can be achieved with the right help.

    Your low vision service

    Your local low vision service can provide support and further information on sight loss. The low vision service will assess and train you to use magnifiers, lighting and low vision equipment. These are available on long term loan from councils/NHS services, including, in some areas, schemes based at local Optometrists or local sight loss charities. Low vision services across the country are delivered by different organisations. For example, they may be based in your local hospital or may be provided by a local sight loss charity. You can ask your Eye Doctor (Ophthalmologist) or the Eye Clinic Liaison Officer about your nearest low vision service.

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:28:36 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:05:20 GMT

    Content provided by RNIB.

    We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

    Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:32:02 GMT
    Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:16 GMT

    Categories
    Damibu company News News

    My first 6 months at Damibu

    Tuesday, July 14th, day one – I jumped in my car and set off to Liverpool. The drive to Liverpool normally takes roughly 45 minutes, but thanks to a late start I only had to be in for 10:30 so I was able to skip all the traffic. After a hectic 15 minutes of trying to find reasonably priced parking around Liverpool Baltic Triangle, I strolled over to the office and was greeted by Dave and John (everyone else was working from home), then asked to take a seat where I was introduced to Ethan. Like me Ethan had just graduated university and was starting his first developer job. Whilst waiting, me and Ethan took the time to get to know each other and found that we had a lot of similar interests and hobbies. This started a good working relationship and really helped ease my first-day nerves.

    The rest of the first week we spent setting up our development environments and looking into documentation for the projects that Damibu work on. As the end of the week came the rest of the team came into the office to have a meeting and this was the first time Ethan and I had met the rest of the team face-to-face. They were all friendly and as a team, we decided that everyone can return to the office and stop working from home.

    Once everyone came back, Ethan and I started on our first project. The project was a testing framework for internal use. We started it by sitting down at the meeting table and going over the tasks we thought would be needed. After discussing, we found an efficient split which worked perfectly to our strengths. I would deal with the frontend of the testing framework and Ethan would handle the backend.

    At times we would both pair program, help each other and both of our strengths really complemented each other. Luckily if we came across something we both got stuck on, we had Dave’s helping hand to guide us in the right direction. During this project, I didn’t once feel overwhelmed or pressured and really enjoyed the time working with Ethan.

    After finishing up the frontend on the testing framework I moved on to working on Damibu Feeds. Here I worked on the site to use a more static layout and refactored some outdated components. I also created a couple of new components for some upcoming features. I really enjoyed working on Feeds as the concept of the project is interesting and the site has a lot of different components to work on.

    Later on in the year, the UK got hit with another wave of COVID-19 infections which led to another national lockdown. Dave thought it would be safest for all of us to work from home so I helped Ethan get some of his office equipment home not knowing that would be the last time I physically saw him.

    As the lockdown went on I was moved from project to project. This is one of the benefits at working at Damibu: there are multiple projects we develop and I’m always moving from one to another. So far I’ve worked on more than five different projects all with their own technological challenges. This keeps things fresh and gives me plenty of opportunities to learn new things.

    Though working at home was a little on the lonely side, it had its positives like no more commutes to and from work; no more super early mornings to get ready; peace and quiet from the bustling life of the city – our office is currently right next to a construction site, though you can’t really hear it in the office. Coming from doing my last year of university from home I was already quite adapt to working from home so this wasn’t anything new to me and I must say it suits me quite well though I do miss the office atmosphere.

    As winter approached and the holidays were upon us Damibu arranged a nice virtual get together over a Zoom call. Dave had arranged for us to have a little dinner banquet delivered to each of use and some alcoholic beverages to accompany it. We had lunch and then for the rest of the day we played a fun quiz and had a good laugh together. It was really nice to see everyone and I really enjoyed the afternoon.

    As far as first graduate job opportunities go I must say that I’ve really enjoyed the last 6 months and have felt really welcomed into the Damibu team. I’m excited to see what the next year brings, be it at home or in the office.